Cabinets of Distinction

Wood

Alder

alder


Information coming soon!

Note:Pictures are for illustration purposes only and will not be an exact representation of the range of color and grade in a shipment. Lumber is a product of nature where every board is unique in grain, color and defects.

 

Alder, Knotty

knotty alder


Information coming soon!

Note:Pictures are for illustration purposes only and will not be an exact representation of the range of color and grade in a shipment. Lumber is a product of nature where every board is unique in grain, color and defects.

 

Ash, White

ash


White Ash grows in all three regions. In the North, the texture of the lumber is firmest while Southern White Ash features a higher sapwood content. White Ash is moderately hard, heavy and strong.

White Ash is used in furniture, cabinets, veneer, flooring, handles and baseball bats. Northern White Ash is occasionally called Brown Ash due to its high heartwood content. White Ash is sometimes used as a substitute for Red Oak.

 

Birch, Red

birch, red


Information coming soon!

Note:Pictures are for illustration purposes only and will not be an exact representation of the range of color and grade in a shipment. Lumber is a product of nature where every board is unique in grain, color and defects.

 

Birch, White

birch, white


Information coming soon!

Note:Pictures are for illustration purposes only and will not be an exact representation of the range of color and grade in a shipment. Lumber is a product of nature where every board is unique in grain, color and defects.

 

Birch, Yellow

birch, yellow


Information coming soon!

Note:Pictures are for illustration purposes only and will not be an exact representation of the range of color and grade in a shipment. Lumber is a product of nature where every board is unique in grain, color and defects.

 

Cherry

cherry


Cherry grows primarily in Appalachian and Northern regions. It is most heavily concentrated in the Allegheny Mountains of northwestern Pennsylvania. The lumber is renowned for its light red heartwood that slowly darkens with age. The wood is moderately heavy and hard. Cherry trees are relatively small so the lumber widths and lengths are often a bit narrower and shorter on average compared to other species.

Cherry is highly regarded in veneer, furniture and cabinets. Given its high cost, substitutes such as Soft Maple and Birch are sometimes stained to imitate Cherry. Buyers of Cherry generally prefer lumber with minimal “gum pockets”, small black streaks that sometimes occur randomly throughout the lumber. The red heartwood stands out from the cream colored sapwood. Some of Midwest’s Cherry is steamed before kiln drying to help bleed the heartwood color into the sapwood.

 

Cherry, Knotty

 

 


Cherry grows primarily in Appalachian and Northern regions. It is most heavily concentrated in the Allegheny Mountains of northwestern Pennsylvania. The lumber is renowned for its light red heartwood that slowly darkens with age. The wood is moderately heavy and hard. Cherry trees are relatively small so the lumber widths and lengths are often a bit narrower and shorter on average compared to other species.

Cherry is highly regarded in veneer, furniture and cabinets. Given its high cost, substitutes such as Soft Maple and Birch are sometimes stained to imitate Cherry. Buyers of Cherry generally prefer lumber with minimal “gum pockets”, small black streaks that sometimes occur randomly throughout the lumber. The red heartwood stands out from the cream colored sapwood. Some of Midwest’s Cherry is steamed before kiln drying to help bleed the heartwood color into the sapwood.

 

Hard Maple

hard maple


Hard Maple is found primarily in Northern and Appalachian regions. It is one of the dominant commercial species in North America and has grown in popularity during the past 10 years thanks to the popularity of lighter wood tones in furniture and cabinets. The sapwood is white to cream colored while the heartwood is gray to brown. It is very hard and heavy.

Hard Maple can be a difficult species to process. It is subject to stain and sticker shadow, especially in warm weather. At MidwestHARDWOOD, Hard Maple is one of our specialties. We have developed handling procedures and kiln schedules to avoid both stain and sticker shadow and still maintain flat, bright lumber.

Hard Maple is used in cabinets, furniture, veneer, flooring and specialty applications. Several species are grouped under the name of Hard Maple including Sugar Maple and Black Maple. Hard Maple is also known as Rock Maple. Soft Maple and Birch ard considered substitutes.

 

Hickory

hickory

Hickory commonly grows in the western third of all three hardwood regions. Its heartwood is a medium brown with a cream colored sapwood. Hickory is hard, heavy and very strong. Of the several varieties, the true Hickories are found in the Appalachian and Northern Regions. In the South, Pecan Hickory is more common. Hickory is used in furniture, paneling, tool handles and utility applications. Alternate species include Elm, Ash and Hackberry. .

 

Red Oak

red oak


Red Oak is the dominant species in all three North American growing regions. The heartwood ranges in color from a light wheat color to dark reddish brown. The sapwood is a light cream color. Red Oak is moderately hard, heavy and strong. Its grain appearance is stronger than that of its cousin, White Oak.

Color and grain are important issues in Red Oak markets. Generally, Northern Red Oak will show the lightest color with more color consistency from board to board and less of the dark mineral streak which is considered a detraction. Northern Red Oak also features a tighter grain, which improves machining characteristics.

Red Oak is widely used in cabinets, furniture, mouldings and flooring. White Oak and White Ash are sometimes considered substitutes.

 

Red Oak (Quarter Sawn)

red oak quarter sawn


Red Oak is the dominant species in all three North American growing regions. The heartwood ranges in color from a light wheat color to dark reddish brown. The sapwood is a light cream color. Red Oak is moderately hard, heavy and strong. Its grain appearance is stronger than that of its cousin, White Oak.

Color and grain are important issues in Red Oak markets. Generally, Northern Red Oak will show the lightest color with more color consistency from board to board and less of the dark mineral streak which is considered a detraction. Northern Red Oak also features a tighter grain, which improves machining characteristics.

Red Oak is widely used in cabinets, furniture, mouldings and flooring. White Oak and White Ash are sometimes considered substitutes.

 

Walnut

Wood Image 1


Walnut grows in all three regions but is concentrated primarily is states such as Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa and Missouri. It is prized for its rich, dark brown heartwood. The sapwood is tan in color. Walnut is normally steamed before kiln drying in order to bleed the color of the heartwood into the sapwood. The wood is fairly soft and moderate in weight. Grading rules for Walnut are somewhat different and a bit more forgiving of natural defects than the rules that govern most other hardwoods.

Walnut is used in furniture, cabinets, gunstocks, trophies, veneer and flooring. Walnut has no clear substitutes but Soft Maple can be stained to match Walnut in color. Butternut has a similar grain pattern but is softer and relatively scarce.

 

White Oak

white oak


White Oak grows in all three regions of North America. Its heartwood is tan to a medium brown, The sapwood is cream colored. The grain of White Oak is more subtle than that of Red Oak. White Oak is very strong and heavy. A large percentage of American White Oak is exported to Europe and Asia where it more closely resembles local species of Oak compared to Red Oak.

White Oak is used for furniture, flooring, barrel staves and cabinets. Alternate species can include Red Oak and White Ash.

 

White Pine (knotty Pine)

white pine


Eastern White Pine, although not a hardwood is used for many of the same applications and is therefore traded by many hardwood lumber companies. White Pine sapwood is a yellowish white with little or no heartwood. The wood is soft and light.

White Pine trades under grade rules that are quite different than hardwood lumber. Grades include C & Better, Cabinet Grade and Furniture Grade. Common uses include furniture, cabinets and paneling. Substitutes may include aspen and Yellow Poplar.

 

Yellow Poplar

yellow poplar


Yellow Poplar, also widely known as Tulipwood grows in Appalachian and Southern Regions. The wood is yellowish white often with a greenish cast. The wood can also show dark streaks. The wood is relatively soft and light
in weight.

Yellow Poplar is used in a wide variety of applications including mouldings, furniture parts and architectural panel products. Substitutes include Aspen
and Basswood.

 

 

Note:Pictures are for illustration purposes only and will not be an exact representation of the range of color and grade in a shipment. Lumber is a product of nature where every board is unique in grain, color and defects.

 

 

 

 

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